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View Viktor Hovland’s Hole-in-One during Ryder Cup Practice Round”

Viktor Hovland Wows Ryder Cup Team with Hole-in-One During Europe’s final practice session before the Ryder Cup, Viktor Hovland delivered a remarkable moment by scoring a hole-in-one on the fifth hole at Marco Simone. The short par 4 fifth hole measures 302 yards and features a greenside pond on the left side of the fairway. Hovland’s impressive shot showcased what’s possible on this challenging hole, setting the stage for an exciting start to the Ryder Cup on Friday.

While his teammates Tyrrell Hatton, Matt Fitzpatrick, and Ludvig Aberg managed to drive the green, it was Viktor Hovland who stole the show with a precise shot using a three-wood off the deck, ultimately scoring a hole-in-one on the challenging fifth hole at Marco Simone during practice.

Viktor Hovland

The news of Viktor Hovland hole-in-one on the fifth hole reached his fellow teammates while they were on the sixth hole. Rory McIlroy inquired with captain Luke Donald about the ace and was informed that it was Viktor Hovland, but it was achieved with his second ball.

In the history of the tournament, there have been six holes-in-one, accomplished by Peter Butler (1973), Nick Faldo (1993), Constantino Rocca (1995), Howard Clark (1995), Paul Casey (2006), and Scott Verplank (2006). Notably, there has only been one hole-in-one on a par-4 in PGA Tour history, achieved by Andrew Magee at the 2001 Phoenix Open.

A federal judge in Florida, U.S. District Court Judge Timothy J. Corrigan, Viktor Hovland has dismissed golfer Patrick Reed’s $750 million defamation lawsuits against the Golf Channel, several of its commentators, and other golf writers and media outlets. Judge Corrigan stated in a 78-page ruling that Reed’s complaints in both lawsuits did not provide enough evidence to demonstrate that the defendants had acted with actual malice when making comments about him. This lack of evidence was deemed fatal to Reed’s defamation claims.

In his ruling, Judge Corrigan noted that Reed’s Amended Complaints included over 50 allegedly defamatory statements. However, he pointed out that many of these statements were not specifically about Reed. Some referred to LIV Golf, of which Reed is a member, but not directly about him. Others were considered matters of opinion or permissible rhetorical hyperbole. Additionally, some statements were based on facts that were not challenged as untrue.

Judge Corrigan emphasized that Reed did not meet the required standard of pleading actual malice to hold the press liable for defamation. While Reed may have been frustrated with negative media coverage, under Florida law and the First Amendment, his defamation claims were not actionable, leading to the dismissal of his cases.

Corrigan also mentioned that he would consider whether the defendants, which included the Gannett Co., The Associated Press, and Fox Sports, should be entitled to recover attorney’s fees and court costs from Reed.

Reed initially filed his federal case during the PGA Tour-LIV Golf feud in Texas in August 2022. He later refiled the case in Florida, accusing numerous defendants of conspiracy, defamation, injurious falsehood, and tortious interference. The complaints alleged that the defendants were co-conspirators engaging in anticompetitive conduct to destroy the LIV Golf Tour, Reed, and other players associated with LIV Golf to eliminate competition with the PGA Tour and DP World Tour. The complaints also claimed that the defendants had made damaging allegations against Reed, including labeling him a “cheater, liar, thief, murderer, and someone who accepts blood money from terrorists.”

Reed, a nine-time winner on the PGA Tour and the 2018 Masters champion, resigned from the PGA Tour due to its suspension of members who participated in LIV Golf tournaments without obtaining conflicting-event releases. Over the course of his PGA Tour career, Reed earned more than $37 million.

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